Programme

08:00
08:30
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
18:30
19:00
19:30
20:00
20:30
Wednesday 20 October
Wednesday 20 October
Arrival of participants
12:00 - 14:00

Opening session
14:00 - 15:30

Moderated by:
- Elizabeth Johnston, Executive Director of Efus
With the participation of:

- Margaritis Schinas, European Commission Vice-President in charge of Promoting our European way of life
- Willy Demeyer, Mayor of LiĂšge (Belgium), President of Efus
- Christian Estrosi, Mayor of Nice, President of Nice Metropole, Deputy President of the Provence Alpes-Cîte d’Azur Region (France), Vice-President of Efus

Plenary session - Security and social cohesion in times of crises

With the participation of:

- Didier Reynders, European Commissioner for Justice - video message
- Klara Dobrev, Vice-President of the European Parliament - video message
- Ahmed Aboutaleb, Mayor of Rotterdam (Netherlands), Vice-President of Efus

Coffee Break
15:30 - 16:00

Networking and Opening of the Stands

Focus session 1
15:30 - 16:00

Training local authorities to provide citizens with a safe urban environment by reducing risks in public spaces (within the framework of the Secu4All project)

Lawrence SchÀtzle, Research Assistant, German and European Forum Allemand for Urban Security (DEFUS)


In English, no translation.

Focus session 2
15:30 - 16:00

Residential security activities of groups of social landlords

RĂ©mi Vincent, General Manager, Interdistrict Tranquillity and Safety Group (GITes) (France)
Michaël Sibilleau, General Manager, Groupement parisien interbailleurs de surveillance (GPIS)


In French, no translation.

Workshop
16:00 - 17:30
The role of cities and regions in preventing discriminatory violence

The role of cities and regions in preventing discriminatory violence

As the level of governance closest to citizens, local and regional bodies are better placed than any other public entity to assess and identify situations where fundamental rights are at stake and to act to protect and support citizens that face discriminatory violence. Indeed, discriminatory violence not only has a traumatic effect on the victim’s physical and mental health, but it also sends a message to whole groups or communities, threatening them with violence and denying them the right to participate in society. As such, it undermines the founding values of democracy, social cohesion and citizens’ security. Local urban security actors can truly make a difference by countering discrimination in their territory through foregrounding prevention and citizen participation.

> How can local and regional actors develop a comprehensive evidence-based response to prevent discriminatory violence incidents and support victims?
> How to improve reporting mechanisms for effective investigations and inter-institutional cooperation on data collection?
> How to develop an effective cross-sectoral cooperation to mobilise the right stakeholders and ensure better support for victims and advice on victims' rights?

With the participation of:

- Shams Asadi, Head of the Human Rights Office, City of Vienna (Austria)
- Patrick Charlier, Director, Centre InterfĂ©dĂ©ral pour l'ÉgalitĂ© des Chances, Belgium (UNIA)
- Sonia Andolz, General Director of Security Administration, Ministry of the Interior - Government of Catalonia (Spain)
- Oscar Escobar, Mayor of Palmira (Colombia), Representative from the international network Peace in Our Cities
- Lucas Leprince, Analyst, Observatory for Prevention and Security, Bruxelles Prévention & Sécurité (BPS) (Belgium)

Translation in English and Spanish

Workshop
16:00 - 17:30
How to implement an integrated strategy for the local nightlife?

How to implement an integrated strategy for the local nightlife?

Nightlife is increasingly important in the attractiveness and economy of a city, and a growing number of local authorities are implementing dedicated strategies aimed at boosting and managing nightlife as well as preventing and reducing related nuisance and risks. A truly integrated nightlife policy must be co-designed with the different nightlife stakeholders and with users.

> How to identify the most relevant partners in a sector that is by nature fragmented?
> How to mobilise them? How to evaluate your local nightlife policy?
> What lessons can be learnt from the experience and recommendations of several European cities as well as the Nightlife Platform, which recently published a methodological guide on nightlife management?

With the participation of:

- Thierry Charlois, Programme Manager for Nightlife, City of Paris (France)
- Vanina Hallab, Programme Manager for Crime Prevention – Coordinator of the ‘Bordeaux La Nuit’ Project, City of Bordeaux (France)
- Denis Tallédec, Director of the Culture Barbars Collective and Coordinator of the Nightlife Platform, Elected official, city of Nantes and to Nantes Métropole (France)
- Simone D’Antonio, European Project ToNIte (Italy)
- RenĂĄta Gallai, Responsible for tourism and culture, 7th District, City of Budapest (Hungary)

Workshop
16:00 - 17:30
Technologies in urban security: opportunities and challenges for the city of the future

Technologies in urban security: opportunities and challenges for the city of the future

The use of technologies has become increasingly common as a means of addressing security challenges, such as incivilities, crowd management, or terrorist threats. For a long time, the emphasis was put on video surveillance technologies. Today, increased computer performance and advances in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) have brought new technologies to the fore and improved the capacities of existing ones. In addition to surveillance technologies, a whole range of civic technologies have emerged that facilitate the involvement of citizens in various governance tasks to improve the quality of public services, including public safety.
How can local stakeholders make an appropriate selection of technologies that respond to their safety needs, and how do these technologies facilitate good governance of urban safety policies? What functionalities of the smart city can be relevant to security and crime prevention? What are the main risks associated with technologies? Can the right to experimentation help cities assess the impact of new technologies on urban security?

With the participation of:

- Anthony Borré, First Deputy Mayor, City of Nice (France)
- Paul Ekblom, Visiting Professor, Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London (United-Kingdom)
- Anniina Autero, Senior Project Manager, City of Tampere (Finland)
- Robin Caroff, Technical Lead, App Elles project, RĂ©sonantes (France)
- Philippe Leclerc, Director of Safety and Security Programmes, SafeCluster (France)

French Crime Prevention Award Ceremony
16:00 - 17:30
French Crime Prevention Award Ceremony

Awarded each year by the French Forum for Urban Security to local actors who implemented inspiring prevention practicies at the local level. This year's topic was "security and mobility".

With the participation of:

- Roger Vicot, Mayor of Lomme and President of the French Forum for Urban Security (FFSU)
- Christian Gravel, Secretary General, Inter-ministerial Committee for the Prevention of Crime and Radicalisation (France) (TBC)
- HĂ©lĂšne de BiĂšve, head of the crime prevention department, Inter-ministerial Committee for the Prevention of Crime and Radicalisation (France)
- Fabrice Fussy, Director of the National Observatory of delinquency in transport, Ministry of Transport (France)
- Amine Smihi, Deputy Mayor, City of Bordeaux (France)

In French, no translation.

Welcome cocktail offered by the City of Nice
17:30 - 18:30

Thursday 21 October
Thursday 21 October
Arrival of participants
08:30 - 09:30

Field Visits

The field visits will take place throughout the day, starting at 09:30 and finishing at 18:00. Registration will be recquired, group departures from the Acropolis.

Workshop
09:30 - 11:00
Know your problem to solve your problem: innovating tools and methods to address urban security challenges

Know your problem to solve your problem: innovating tools and methods to address urban security challenges

Local and regional authorities are faced with constantly-evolving security challenges. They have to deal with shifts in governance structures and limited financial resources. Another important factor is high-tech development, which changes the way we tackle problems. This means public policy makers have to continually adapt their services to new challenges in the field. Such adaptability is only possible if they have the right tools to properly understand these challenges. How can cities multiply sources of information and foster an environment in which every population group’s realities and perceptions of urban security are taken into account? How to include a diverse and representative range of stakeholders? How to decide what information is relevant and how to weigh perceptions of insecurity?

With the participation of:

- Roger Vicot, Mayor of Lomme, Vice-President of the European Metropolis of Lille, Departmental Councillor for the Nord (France), President of the FFSU
- Barbara Holtmann, Director, Fixed Africa (South Africa)
- Caroline Davey, Director, Design against Crime Solution Centre, University of Salford (United Kingdom)
- Angelos Mimis, Associate Professor, University of Panteion (Greece)
- Aaron Landsman, Visiting lecturer, Princeton University, Artist in Residence, Abrons Arts Center (USA)

Workshop
09:30 - 11:00
Tackling polarisation in our cities: tools and practices to foster inclusive and cohesive societies

Tackling polarisation in our cities: tools and practices to foster inclusive and cohesive societies

As it fuels conflict and forecloses opportunities for dialogue and mutual understanding, polarisation threatens social cohesion and urban security. It can be understood as a process of sharpening differences between groups in society that can result in increased tensions; as rampant ‘us-and-them thinking’, social division and hostility that gain ground in our communities and as a driving factor of radicalisation that may lead to extremist violence. Polarisation and escalating tensions have increased during the Covid-19 pandemic in cities and regions throughout Europe, and created a breeding ground for violent extremism. Addressing polarisation is thus an integral part of comprehensive strategies to prevent urban violence and foster social cohesion.

> How can local and regional authorities prevent and mitigate polarisation in times of crisis?
> How can we foster and facilitate dialogue between different groups of society?
> Which tools and practices have been tested to mitigate polarisation and foster inclusiveness and participation in our cities?
> Which stakeholders need to be involved?

With the participation of:

- Christian Kromberg, First Deputy Mayor, City of Essen, President of the German Forum for Urban Security (DEFUS) (Germany)
- Werner Van Herle, Head of the Prevention and Security Department, City of Mechelen (Belgium)
- Markus Pausch, Professor, Salzburg University of Applied Sciences (Austria)
- Malin Martelius, Security and Radicalisation Prevention Coordinator, City of Malmö (Sweden)
- Manuel Comeron, Department of Urban Security Strategic Analysis, City of LiĂšge (Belgium)

Translation in English, Spanish and Italian

Workshop
09:30 - 11:00
The involvement and role of citizens in crisis management

The involvement and role of citizens in crisis management

The Covid pandemic, floods in Alemannic Europe, fires in the Mediterranean: the events of the past few months have once again shed light on the central role that local authorities play in disaster response. Whatever the severity or nature of these major crises (health, climate, but also terrorism, chemical accidents, etc.), local authorities must plan their prevention and respond to them by employing locally-available resources. To guarantee the ultimate efficiency of such measures, it is essential that citizens are included in emergency planning and crisis management.
> Why is it essential to improve coordination between citizens and civil protection stakeholders?
> How can authorities / public services ensure the legitimacy, creation, and recognition of citizen-led initiatives or actions?
> How can we restructure / fluidify collaborations between stakeholders in order to improve different forms of crisis management and thus service to citizens?

With the participation of:

- Torsten Akmann, State Secretary of the Interior at the Berlin Senate Department of the Interior and Sports, City-State of Berlin (Germany)
- Giacomo Bianchi, Project Manager, European Security Organisation (Belgium)
- Gilles Mahieu, Governor of Walloon Brabant, Province of Walloon Brabant (Belgium)
- Gil Marsalla, Founder, Weekends solidaires, Nice (France)
- Yves Van de Vloet, Associated Expert, Efus

Parallel Session
09:30 - 11:00
Design Thinking: an experiential session on an innovative approach to urban security

Design Thinking: an experiential session on an innovative approach to urban security - IcARUS

Redesigning how we think can transform the way in which organisations develop products, services, processes, and strategies. Design Thinking is a human-centered and creative process to problem solving. It seeks to better understand the users and their unmet needs, challenge assumptions, and redefine problems with experts and practitioners from different fields in a co-creative way to find innovative answers that are sometimes unobvious. During this session, participants will take part in a practical exercise and will endeavour to apply the design thinking approach in an attempt to co-create innovative solutions to tackle a specific challenge within urban security.

Introduction to the DT methodology
Through real and documented examples of urban security challenges faced by cities, you will experiment some design thinking approaches

> Exercise 1: Walk in their shoes (Empathising)
In this exercise you will be asked to put yourself in the shoes of different persons. You will imagine that you are this person, and that you have a year to solve the proposed issue. You will be faced with security challenges such as burglary, urban violence, excessive drinking, pickpocketing, and robbing.

>Exercise 2: Define the problem (Explore)
An important phase of design thinking is to define the problem, and to question the “why”. You will take part in a small brainstorming session to try to identify the (multiple) ‘whys’ of one challenge.

> Exercise 3: Think outside of the box (Creativity)
This exercise will give you an example of tools to ‘think outside of the box’.

With the participation of:
- Maud Ridoux, Director of Engagement Programme for Sustainable Regions, Makesense (France)
- Massimo Fattori, Researcher, Erasmus University (Netherlands)
- Genny Dimitrakopoulou, Research Fellow, KEMEA (Greece)

In English, no translation.
Participation in this session is limited to 40 people.

Coffee Break
11:00 - 11:30

Networking

Focus session 1
11:00 - 11:30

Collaborative Urban Risk Assessment (CURiM) for the collection and analysis of crime-related data (within the framework of the BeSecure-FeelSecure project)

Marios Zacharis, Senior Manager R&D, Space Hellas (Greece)


In English, no translation.

Focus session 2
11:00 - 11:30

The TAPAJ System (Alternative paid work by the day)

Jean-Hugues Morales, National Delegate, TAPAJ France


In French, no translation.

Workshop
11:30 - 13:00
Local roots and impacts of organised crime

Local roots and impacts of organised crime

Organised crime is embedded in local economic and social structures and operates both internationally and locally. It is a threat to many development objectives, such as the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) nÂș16 – “peace, justice and strong institutions” –, and it is an obstacle to peaceful and inclusive societies, and to accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. This is why local authorities should be encouraged to combine social, economic and repressive measures to prevent and fight it. The Covid-19 pandemic has fuelled some types of crime, in particular in the cyber space, while organised crime has adapted by shifting some of its operations.
> What lessons can be learnt from this situation in order to achieve long-term sustainable results in the fight against organised crime?
> What practices have local and regional authorities implemented to foster a culture of legality, to prevent the infiltration of organised crime, and to fight against trafficking?

With the participation of

- André Vervooren, Director of the City of Rotterdam (Netherlands), Vice-President Efus
- Mark Boekwijt, Representative to the EU, City of Amsterdam (Netherlands)
- Gian Guido Nobili, Chef du Département de la sécurité urbaine et de la prévention de la criminalité, Région Emilie-Romagne, Directeur, Forum Italien pour la Sécurité Urbaine (FISU) (Italie)
- Rachel Locke, Director, Impact: Peace Institute Joan B. Kroc for Peace and Justice, School Kroc at the University of San Diego (USA) - André Vervooren, Director, Department of Public Security, City of Rotterdam (Netherlands)
- Jörg Rock, Head of Supervision Police, Senate of the Interior and Sport, City of Berlin (Germany)

Translation in English, Spanish and Italian

Workshop
11:30 - 13:00
Security continuum and the diversification of security stakeholders

Security continuum and the diversification of security stakeholders

Local security and crime prevention policies involve a large number of public and private stakeholders who need to coordinate their interventions within the remit of the respective competencies. Complementing national authorities’ exclusive competencies such as the national police and the justice system, local and regional authorities carry out activities that contribute to public security and peace. The increase in demand for security, which is notably linked to the terrorist attacks of the past decade or so, has been met with an increase in the offer. Besides the public institutions operating in the security field, other stakeholders contribute to security policies, such as the third sector, citizens, the commercial sector and private security companies. All these actors have different professional cultures, modus operandi and purposes, which raises questions about training, and the need to clarify their respective roles and prerogatives, to harmonize legislations, to cooperate, and to take into account actions led by citizens and civil society.
> How to bring about a common ‘security culture’?
> How to clarify the roles and interventions of these different stakeholders in order to increase their efficiency?
> What training should these actors receive?
> How to take into account citizens and civil society?

- Xavier Latour, Dean of the Faculty of Law and Political Science, Université CÎte d'Azur (France)
- Virginie Malochet, Sociologist, Institut Paris RĂ©gion (France)
- VĂ©ronique Ketelaer, International Police Expert, Enabel (Benin)
- Javier Scotto di Tella Manresa, Deputy Mayor for Security, Equality and Diversity and Public Health, City of DĂ©nia (Spain)
- Nicolas Nordman, Deputy Mayor in charge of Prevention, Security, Municipal Police and Victim Support, City of Paris (France)

Workshop
11:30 - 13:00
For a fair and transparent use of AI technologies in urban security

For a fair and transparent use of AI technologies in urban security

Artificial intelligence (AI)-based technologies offer an array of opportunities in the domain of urban security. Promises include an effective search for missing people, tracking criminals, facilitating administrative decision-making, and processing large amounts of data that can guide security authorities in their daily operations. In April 2021, the European Union proposed the world’s first draft for a legal framework to regulate the use of AI. However, the implementation of such technologies requires careful consideration of its consequences. Many ethical, legal and social questions arise as the practice of surveillance and governance change with the introduction of this new digital infrastructure.
> What are the ethical, legal and social risks of employing AI-based technology in the domain of urban security and crime prevention?
> How to reconcile the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms with the desire for order and security?
> How to preserve autonomy and anonymity in public spaces?
> How can local authorities build trust in their use of technology?
> How can risk minimization requirements such as high-quality datasets, traceability and appropriate human oversight be mainstreamed?

With the participation of:

- Matthieu Branlat, Senior Scientist, SINTEF Digital and Technical Manager of H2020 Project IMPETUS
- Oskar Gstrein, Researcher and Assistant Professor, University of Groningen (Netherlands)
- William Eldin, Director General, XXII (France)
- Lina Oueidat, National Coordinator of Information and Communication Technologies, Government of Lebanon

Parallel Session
11:30 - 13:00
EU funding opportunities for local and regional authorities

EU funding opportunities for local and regional authorities

This workshop will be the occasion to explore EU funding opportunities for local and regional authorities. It is organised in the framework of the Partnership on security in public spaces of the Urban agenda for the European Union (Action 2), coordinated by Efus, the Cities of Nice and Madrid.

- Thijs Fikken, Expert, Urban Agenda, (Action 2)
- Monica Visentin, Senior Policy Officer, Unione della Romagna Faentina (Italy)

In English, no translation.

Lunch
13:00 - 14:30
Networking

Networking

Focus session 1
14:00 - 14:30

The role of technological innovation in protecting our continuously changing society

Philo Daniel, Global Director Urban Security, Smiths Detection


In English, no translation.

Focus session 2
14:00 - 14:30

Changing the paradigm of drug policy in Europe

Fabien Bilheran, police officer, Law Enforcement Action Partnership (LEAP) Europe (France)
Neil Woods, police officer formerly infiltrated, Law Enforcement Action Partnership (LEAP) Europe (United Kingdom)


Partly in French, partly in English, no translation.

Workshop
14:30 - 16:00
Cities and Justice: the role of local and regional authorities

Cities and Justice: the role of local and regional authorities

Local authorities are key actors in preventing conflicts and tensions that arise among the local population from escalating, and when these do nevertheless flare up, they can intervene to de-escalate the situation. They can use a range of innovative tools and methods to rapidly and impartially mediate between opposing groups, such as the concept of “Mediator City” whereby a permanent Peacemaking Committee working closely with the local administration is tasked with prevention and conflict resolution, or the Restorative City, which uses restorative justice methods and tools.
> How can local authorities effectively and impartially mediate conflicts?
> What concrete tools can local authorities mobilise to decrease or de-escalate tensions and conflicts?

With the participation of:

- Julie Escudier, Vice President of Toulouse MĂ©tropole (France) (TBC)
- Cristina Vasilescu, Researcher, Institute for Social Research (IRS), Member of the European Forum for Restorative Justice
- Tim Chapman, Expert and Chair, Member of European Forum for Restorative Justice
- Ivo Aertsen, Emeritus Professor of Criminology, University of Leuven (Belgium)
- Alexander Mauz, Executive Board Member, Programmes and Qualification, forumZFD (Germany)

Workshop
14:30 - 16:00
How to restore and strengthen trust between citizens and institutions?

How to restore and strengthen trust between citizens and institutions?

The latest Eurostat barometer of EU citizens’ confidence in European institutions shows an overall 10% drop since 2014, albeit with strong disparities between Member States. European citizens tend to trust less European institutions, which they consider distant and disconnected from their daily concerns, than national and local authorities. The handling of the Covid crisis has further damaged trust in some EU countries. Mayors and other local elected officials are on the front line regarding the issues that matter most to citizens, embodying day-to-day politics and the resolution of practical issues. Local authorities have the power to mobilise and organise solidarity and are key intermediaries and facilitators between institutions and citizens. However, this proximity also has a negative side when citizens express their anger or frustration by directly attacking local elected officials. In France, this type of assault has trebled between 2019 and 2020. The gender issue is also at play in the aggressions against female elected officials.
> How to restore relations and trust between citizens and local elected officials?
> What are the benefits of co-producing security with citizens, and how to implement or strengthen such cooperation?
> What new tools can local authorities use to improve citizens’ confidence in public institutions?

With the participation of:

- Monica Curca, Director, +Peace Narrative & Cultural Strategist, Peace in our Cities Network
- Jacques de Maillard, Director, Centre de recherches sociologiques sur le droit et les institutions pénales, (CESDIP)
- Serge Mantovani, Deputy Director General, City of LiĂšge (Belgium)
- Christian Specht, First Deputy Mayor, City of Mannheim (Germany), Vice-President of Efus (TBC)
- Alexandre Touzet, Mayor of Saint-Yon (France), Member of the Commission for Security and Crime Prevention, Association of Mayors and Presidents of Inter-municipalities (AMF) (France)

Translation in English, Spanish and Italian

Workshop
14:30 - 16:00
Climate change and urban security - How to foster urban resilience?

Climate change and urban security - How to foster urban resilience?

As urban settings are particularly exposed to the impacts of climate change, cities are compelled to undergo transformations in almost every sector and area of urban life. As we collectively reflect on the impact of climate change on urban security and explore the role of urban security actors in the development of resilience strategies, three aspects must be explored:
1) How does climate change, notably extreme weather events, impact urban security, and what indirect effects should be taken into account, e.g increasing socioeconomic inequalities, changing use patterns of public urban spaces?
2) The recent floods and wildfires in Europe led to the loss of lives and livelihoods and crimes occurring in the aftermath exacerbated the tense situation in the affected areas. How can crime prevention be included into comprehensive crisis management and disaster relief plans?
3) As many cities are ready to develop resilience strategies, how can we include urban security aspects? How can the cooperation with relevant services (eg. urban planning, environmental departments) be facilitated?

With the participation of:

- Anna Rau, Executive Director, German and European Forum for Urban Security (DEFUS)
- Felix Munger, Executive Director, Municipal Canadian Network for Crime Prevention (Canada)
- Piero Pelizzaro, Chief Resilience Officer, City of Milan (Italy)
- Benedek JĂĄvor, Head of the Representation of Budapest at the EU (Hungary)
- Nuno de Sousa, Civil Protection Engineer, City of SĂ©tubal (Portugal)

Italian Crime Prevention Award Cermony
14:30 - 16:00

Crime Prevention Award Cermony - Italian Forum for Urban Security (FISU)

Moderator - Gian Guido Nobili, Head of the Department of Urban Security and Crime Prevention, Emilia Romagna Region, Director, Italian Forum for Urban Security (FISU) (Italy)

With the participation of:

- Benedetta Albanese, Deputy Mayor for Security, City of Florence (Italy)
- Riccardo De Corato, Deputy Mayor for Security, Lombardy Region (Italy)
- Fabrizio Cristalli, Director General of the Security Department, Lombardy Region (Italy)
- Giovanni Gargano, Mayor of Castelfranco Emilia (Italy)

In Italian, no translation.

Coffee Break
16:00 - 16:30

Networking

Focus session 1
16:00 - 16:30

Development cooperation, security and local authorities: The example of setting up support for community policing in Lebanon

Sebastian Sperber, Head of Security Sector Reform & Migration, CIVIPOL (France)


In English, no translation.

Focus session 2
16:00 - 16:30

Perception matters.

Francesc Guillen Lasierra, Head of Projects and Organisation, Government of Catalonia (Spain)


In French, no translation.

Workshop
16:30 - 18:00
How cities can design and manage safer, more inclusive public spaces

How cities can design and manage safer, more inclusive public spaces

Public spaces are at the heart of urban life: this is where people gather, meet, play, express their opinions and share a feeling of belonging to their city and even country. By nature open to all, public spaces are also inherently vulnerable to major threats, such as terrorism, but also incivilities and petty crime, assaults, street robberies, vandalism, pickpocketing, arson and harassment, which gravely affect citizens’ feeling of security. In this sense, public spaces play an important role in strengthening social cohesion in a city or a neighbourhood. Conversely, when they are neglected or badly managed, they can generate more exclusion and marginalisation. Planning, designing, managing, and securing these spaces while respecting fundamental freedoms is a complex challenge for local and regional authorities, which are striving to embed security in the design and management of such spaces in partnership with local communities.
> How can Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) and Security by Design principles reduce both crime and the fear of crime?
> How can local authorities establish large partnerships to address urban planning and the design and management of security in public spaces?
> How to ensure safety measures and surveillance equipment do not infringe on the right to privacy and civil liberties?

With the participation of:

- Andrea Bosi, Deputy in charge of Public Works, Historic centre and legality, City of Modena (Italy)
- Paul van Soomeren, Founder, DSP-Groep (Netherlands), Chair, Working Group on Crime Prevention and Stakeholder Collaboration, European Committee for Standardisation (CEN)
- Laetitia Wolff, Design Impact Advisor and teacher, Sustainable Design School (SDS), Nice (France)
- Ana VerĂłnica Neves, Sociologist and crime prevention expert, Lisbon Municipal Police (Portugal)
- Umberto Nicolini, Director, Laboratorio QualitĂ  Urbana E Sicurezza (LabQUS) (Italy), Chair, EU Cost Action TU1203

Translation in English, Spanish and Italian

Workshop
16:30 - 18:00
Rethinking our drug prevention and reduction policies

Rethinking our drug prevention and reduction policies

As new types of illicit substances become available and new modes of consumption create new risks, local authorities see new drug markets taking shape and face new challenges in preventing such traffics and reducing risks.
The current legislative framework cannot be used to reduce consumption and safeguard public spaces, which is where most of the consumption and trafficking take place. The existence of a drug market and the fact that it is sometimes openly visible to citizens have serious health consequences (addiction, transmission of diseases, cleanliness of public spaces) as well as a significant impact on security (public and mixed spaces being ‘occupied’, social control, trafficking, score settling between rival gangs
) and on the culture of legality (feeling of lawlessness and of the impotence of local and national public institutions as being impotent).
> To what extent can local authorities intervene against drugs, which is a political issue controlled by national governments?
> Local authorities have developed a whole array of risk reduction measures. How to promote these measures and to develop new ones, in accordance with the law?
All types of dependency should be considered as well as each individual characteristic in order to bring about universal risk reduction in accordance with the characteristics of each neighbourhood and each community of partners. If the prevention of risks is a key aspect of any local policy on drugs, drug trafficking must also be addressed.
> What opportunities do local authorities have to prevent young people from getting into trafficking?

With the participation of:

- LaurÚne Collard, Head of the Federal Life and Partnerships Department, Fédération Addiction (France)
- Laurence Comminette, Mayor's Office, City of LiĂšge (Belgium)
- Laurent Maisse, Deputy Director, Asbl Transit - Brussels-Capital Region (Belgium)
- Jean-Claude Menault, Deputy Mayor, City of Lille (France)
- Sarah Misslin, Deputy Mayor, City of Ivry-sur-Seine, Vice-President of FFSU (France)
- Maria LuĂ­sa Salgueiro, Mayor of Matosinhos (Portugal)

Workshop
16:30 - 18:00
How can local and regional authorities foster youth participation in urban security policies?

How can local authorities foster youth participation in urban security policies?

There are about 1.2 billion people aged between 15 and 24 in the world, approximately 15% of the population (1). These young people are key agents in building democratic cultures and societies and represent a creative force and a dynamic source of innovations. However, the young also face poverty, barriers to education, multiple forms of discrimination and limited employment prospects and opportunities. Efus believes it is necessary to mobilise young citizens to build social cohesion and a more inclusive society. Initiatives aimed at encouraging their participation in urban security policies should be promoted and reinforced by local authorities.
> What measures and tools do local authorities have at their disposal to encourage youth actions and engagement in policy-making?
> Which actors must be mobilised at the local level to obtain meaningful results?
> What are the benefits for local authorities of involving young people in the design and implementation of security policies?
> How can peers be mobilised?

With the participation of:

- Loline Bertin, Deputy Mayor of Montreuil for public tranquillity, cleanliness, prevention and nightlife, City of Montreuil (France)
- Götz Nordbruch, Co-founder and Co-executive director, Ufuq.de (Germany)
- LĂ©onie Tchatat, President and Director General, Passerelle-I.DE (Canada)
- Charles Nagy, Representative of Espoir 18, City of Paris (France)
- Jan Willems, Prevention Officer, Directorate of Security and Prevention, City of Leuven (Belgium)
- Philippe Ternes, Contact Point CERV, Centre for Political Education (Luxembourg)

______
(1) UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Parallel Session
16:30 - 18:00
Experiental workshop: City-Based People's Assembly

Experiential Workshop: City-Based People Assembly

This participatory workshop is designed for city leaders and civil society stakeholders. Participants will work collaboratively on various scenarios in order to co-create inclusive solutions to prevent urban violence and insecurity.They will gain knowledge on Peace in Our Cities, a network dedicated to achieving the United Nations 2030 Agenda’s goal of halving violence in our cities by 2030.

Facilitators: +Peace Team

- Monica Curca, Director, +Peace Narrative & Cultural Strategist, Peace in our Cities International Network
- Thor Morales, Connected Stories Manager

The workshop will create a space for ideation and scenario building for engagement efforts in cities, including but not limited to:

> community building events
> public meetings
> strategic planning meetings and retreats
> alliance-building meetings and retreats
> conflict transformation and resolution
> reflection and evaluation

Cocktail offered by the Peace in Our Cities international network
19:00 - 20:00
Reserved to participants who booked the dinner

Dinner

The conference dinner must be booked from your personal space on the registration platform. Restaurant Le Boccaccio, 7 rue Masséna, 06000 Nice

Friday 22 October
Friday 22 October
Arrival of participants
08:30 - 09:00

Workshop
09:00 - 10:30
The challenge of promoting safe and sustainable urban tourism

The challenge of promoting safe and sustainable urban tourism

With the participation of :

- Martine Ouaknine, Deputy Mayor, City of Nice (France)
- ‎Kyriaki Bourdakou, Deputy Mayor, City of Piraeus (Greece)
- JoĂŁo LĂĄzaro, President of the Portuguese association for victim support APAV (Portugal)
- Ignacio Ibåñez, Coordinator, Vulnerable Targets Programme, Special Projects and Innovation Branch, United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism (UNOCT) (Spain)
- Fernando Gaona, Deputy Headquarters & Security Advisor, Municipal Police, Xabia (Spain)

Translation in English, Spanish and Italian

Workshop
09:00 - 10:30
Foresight strategies to better protect public spaces and promote urban resilience

Foresight strategies to better protect public spaces and promote urban resilience

Complex emergencies, crisis situations and terrorist threats against vulnerable public spaces considered as soft targets call upon local authorities, responsible for the safety and security of citizens, to step up their efforts and devise strategies that better equip them to respond to such threats and risks. This requires keeping abreast of the evolving threats and risks that can affect urban public spaces. It also means that local security practitioners must adopt better protection practices.

With the participation of:

- Sophie Lavaux, Managing Director, Bruxelles Prévention Sécurité (BPS) (Belgium)
- Adam Crawford, Director, Professor of Criminology, School of Law at the University of Leeds (United Kingdom)
- Peter Van de Crommert, European Project Coordinator, Dutch Institute for Technology, Safety and Security (DITSS)
- Marc Leoutre, Policy Officer, Counter Terrorism Unit, Directorate General for Migration and Home Affairs (DG HOME), European Commission
- Miila Lukkarinen, Specialist, Safety and Preparedness Unit, Executive Office of the City of Helsinki (Finland)

Workshop
09:00 - 10:30
Cities and Mediation

Cities and mediation

On the beat every day in the streets, close to residents and often acting as intermediaries between them and public institutions, social mediators facilitate daily life and defuse conflicts. As impartial third parties, they work in five areas: public spaces and social housing; access to law and services; public transport; school and youth, and resident participation. In this respect, they play a key role in crime prevention and security and are key partners for local authorities.

> What are the principles and modus operandi of social mediation?
> How can local authorities include social mediation in their local security partnership?
> Who are the social mediators (volunteers, peers, professionals) and why and how to professionalize this sector?

With the participation of:

- Maite Casado Cadarso, Director of the Security and Prevention Department, City of Barcelona (Spain) (TBC)
- Eléonore Becat, Deputy Director in charge of the Local Security and Crime Prevention Council, Urban Social Development Department, City of Bordeaux (France)
- Laurent Giraud, Director, France MĂ©diation (France)
- Ms. Janina Hentschel, Head of the municipal local prevention office, Augsburg (Germany)
- Àngels Vila Muntal, Director of the Prevention Department, City of Barcelona

Panel of mayors
09:00 - 10:30
French Forum for Urban Security (FFSU)

Panel of mayors of the French Forum for Urban Security (FFSU)

With the participation of :

- Roger Vicot, Mayor of Lomme (France), Vice-President of the European Metropolis of Lille, Departmental Councillor for the Nord, President of the French Forum for Urban Security (FFSU)
- Pierre Hurmic, Mayor of Bordeaux (France)

In French, no translation.

Coffee Break
10:30 - 11:00

Networking

Focus session 1
10:30 - 11:00

Insights into subjective safety in urban space - A practical toolkit to measure feelings of insecurity

Melanie SchlĂŒter, Associate Researcher, State Office for Criminal Investigations (LKA), Lower Saxony (Germany)


In English, no translation.

Focus session 2
10:30 - 11:00

ToNite's innovative solutions for increased social cohesion and urban security

Gianfranco Todesco, Chief commissioner, Local Police of Turin (Italy)


In English, no translation.

Panel of Mayors
11:00 - 12:30
Cities as leaders in security, innovation and solidarity

Cities of security, innovation and solidarity

Moderated by:

- Willy Demeyer, Mayor of LiĂšge (Belgium), President Efus
- Anthony Borré, First Deputy Mayor, Vice-President of the Nice CÎte d'Azur Metropolis

With the participation of:

- Oriol AmorĂłs, Secretary General of the Ministry of the Interior, Government of Catalonia (Spain)
- Matteo Biffoni, Mayor of Prato (Italy), President of the Italian Forum for Urban Security (FISU)
- Hans Bonte, Mayor of Vilvorde (Belgium)
- Maria LuĂ­sa Salgueiro, Mayor of Matosinhos (Portugal)
- Christian Specht, Vice-Mayor of Mannheim (Germany), Vice-President of Efus
- Tadeusz Truskolaski, Mayor of the City of BiaƂystok (Poland), President of the Union of Polish Metropolises
- Roger Vicot, Mayor of Lomme, Vice-President of the European Metropolis of Lille, Departmental Councillor for the Nord, President of the FFSU

Lunch
12:30 - 14:00
Networking

Networking

Focus session 1
13:30 - 14:00

Using Collaborative Learning to Understand and Prevent Urban Violence

Maureen Moriarty-Lempke, Senior Associate, Land and Human Security, CDA Collaborative Learning (United States)


In English, no translation.

Focus session 2
13:30 - 14:00

Sustainable Design

Students of the Sustainable Design School


In French, no translation.

Keynote speech - Ylva Johansson

Ylva Johansson, European Commissioner for Home Affairs, European Commission, will address the following topic:

> European and local, a common future: preventing and fighting organised crime, cyber threats and terrorism

Read the biography

Closing session
14:15 - 15:00

Moderated by:
- Sebastien Viano, Director Europe, City of Nice (France)

With the participation of:

- Jelena Drenjanin, Chair of the Governance Committee, Spokesperson for Gender Equality, Congress of Local and Regional Authorities, Council of Europe
- Willy Demeyer, Mayor of LiĂšge (Belgium), President of Efus
- Christian Estrosi, Mayor of Nice, President of Nice Metropole, Deputy President of the Provence Alpes-Cîte d’Azur Region (France), Vice-President of Efus

Thursday 21 October

Field visits

After the attack of July 14, 2016, the City of Nice reinforced the security along the 5.3 km of the Promenade des Anglais by investing in innovative design and equipment while preserving the harmony of this emblematic public space of the city. The architectural, landscaped and urbanistic scenery of the Promenade was given World Heritage status by UNESCO in the summer of 2021.

> secutopic: Public spaces
> location: Promenade des Anglais
> more information

Afternoon visit:
> departure: 14:15 – Acropolis
> return: 16:00 – Back to the Acropolis

The Urban Supervision Center (CSU) is the operational command center of the city of Nice, to which all the cameras of the video surveillance network that protects the city of Nice are connected.

> secutopic: Innovation & technology
> location: CSU – Place du GĂ©nĂ©ral de Gaulle
> more information

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:30 – Acropolis
> Return: 11:30 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 14:00 – Acropolis
> Return: 16:00 – Back to the Acropolis

The city of Nice restored the old Batterie Russe military fort and converted it into a training centre for the security and emergency services. Named after lieutenant colonel Arnaud Beltrame, who was killed by a terrorist in 2018, the centre is used by the municipal police and other security partners such as the national police, the gendarmerie, and the departmental fire and emergency services. The visit will showcase several types of operation: use of drones, close-quarter combat, negotiation


> secutopic: Police & justice
> location: Avenue Raoul Dufy
> more information

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:30 – Acropolis
> Return: 12:30 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 14:00 – Acropolis
> Return: 17:00 – Back to the Acropolis

Established in 2002, the P@je association seeks to improve social cohesion, quality of life and child welfare in the Alpes Maritimes department through mediation and social and educational inteventions. Through these activities, it seeks to convey civic values such as respect, tolerance, and the rights of women and children. The morning visit will focus on prevention at school. Participants will board a mini-bus to go to the La Bourgade college, where mediation actions will be presented. The afternoon visit will focus on prevention in the transport system. It will take place in the Nice-Ville train station, where participants will meet with railway staff.

> secutopic: Mediation & security dedicated professions
> location: Pîle Accompagnement Judiciaire et Éducatif (P@JE)
> more information

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:30 – Acropolis
> Return: 11:30 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 14:00 – Acropolis
> Return: 16:00 – Back to the Acropolis

The ADAM association is a resource centre which welcomes, orientates, facilitates, listens to, and accompanies the inhabitants of the Moulins neighbourhood and cares for all aspects of daily family life. This association encourages initiatives from local families and residents by promoting social, cultural and inter-generational mixing, all the while fostering an understanding and openness in society.

> secutopic: Mediation & security dedicated professions
> location: ADAM – 32 rue de la Santoline
> more information

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:30 – Acropolis
> Return: 12:30 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 14:00 – Acropolis
> Return: 16:30 – Back to the Acropolis

L’abri cĂŽtier is a local service that cares for adult women who have been victims of domestic violence. This secure site offers support, rest and legal aid.

> secutopic: Discriminatory violence
> location: confidential
> more information

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:45 – Acropolis
> Return: 11:30 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 14:15 – Acropolis
> Return: 16:00 – Back to the Acropolis

This centre is dedicated to the prevention of violence against women.

> secutopic: Discriminatory violence
> location: confidential

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:40 – Acropolis
> Return: 11:30 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 14:10 – Acropolis
> Return: 16:00 – Back to the Acropolis

The House for Victim Support (Maison pour l’Accueil des Victimes, MAV) is a pluridisciplinary facility that helps victims in their legal procedures and provides psychological counselling. In the immediate aftermath of the 14 July 2016 terrorist attack, the MAV played a key role in helping victims and families, in particular through the establishment of the Interministerial Unit for Victim Support (CIAV).

> secutopic: Discriminatory violence
> location: 6 rue Gubernatis

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:45 – Acropolis
> Return: 11:45 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 14:15 – Acropolis
> Return: 16:15 – Back to the Acropolis

The RĂ©gie Lignes d’Azur operates the transport network made up of tram and bus lines on behalf of the Nice CĂŽte dÂŽAzur metropolis. In order to reinforce the safety of users and staff, all means of transport are equipped with a video surveillance system linked to the Command Center of the Lignes d’Azur control room and the Centre of Urban Supervision as well as the municipal police. From the centralized control station of the transport network, agents from the Transport Security Control Group (GSCT) ensure the safety of passengers and drivers. This visit includes a visit to the Sappia command center and a visit to the workshop where the vehicles are equipped and maintained.

> secutopic: Innovation & technology
> location: Terminus Henri Sappia
> more information

 

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:30 – Acropolis
> Return: 12:00 – Back to the Acropolis

Afternoon visit:

> Departure: 13:45 – Acropolis
> Return: 16:45 – Back to the Acropolis

Established in 1904, La Semeuse is an association dedicated to educational and social work. Located in the centre of Nice, the social centre La Ruche organises numerous activities for children, young people, families and senior citizens. The visit of La Ruche will include meetings with its president, Jean Fournier, as well as with mediators and educators and will highlight the links between mediation and crime prevention. Participants will also meet with the “Brigade of Les Petits Nettoyeurs” (‘the little cleaners’) and with educators from the Vernier college.

> secutopic: Mediation & security dedicated professions
> location: La ruche – 3 rue Trachel
> more information

Morning visit:

> Departure: 09:45 – Acropolis
> Return: 11:30 – Back to the Acropolis