Simultaneous interpretation will be provided from and into French and English for all plenary sessions and workshops. Parallel sessions will not have translation (the language is indicated in the session description).

Programme

08:00
08:30
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
18:30
19:00
19:30
20:00
20:30
Wednesday 20 October
Wednesday 20 October
Arrival of participants
12:00 - 14:00

Opening session
14:00 - 15:00

With the participation of:

- Willy Demeyer, Mayor of LiĂšge (Belgium), President of Efus
- Christian Estrosi, Mayor of Nice (France), Vice-President of Efus
- Margaritis Schinas, Vice-President of the European Commission, responsible for migration issues and Commissioner for the promotion of the European way of life

Plenary session
15:00 - 15:30

With the participation of:

- Ahmed Aboutaleb, Mayor of Rotterdam (Netherlands), Vice-President of Efus
- Ylva Johansson, European Commissioner for Home Affairs (tbc)

Coffee Break / Focus sessions
15:30 - 16:00

Networking and Opening of the Stands

Workshop
16:00 - 17:30
The role of cities and regions in preventing discriminatory violence

As the level of governance closest to citizens, local and regional bodies are better placed than any other public entity to assess and identify situations where fundamental rights are at stake and to act to protect and support citizens that face discriminatory violence. Indeed, discriminatory violence not only has a traumatic effect on the victim’s physical and mental health, but it also sends a message to whole groups or communities, threatening them with violence and denying them the right to participate in society. As such, it undermines the founding values of democracy, social cohesion and citizens’ security. Local urban security actors can truly make a difference by countering discrimination in their territory through foregrounding prevention and citizen participation.

With the participation of:

- Mayor LuĂ­sa Maria Neves Salgueiro of Matosinhos, Portugal (TBC)
-Patrick Charlier, Director, Centre InterfĂ©dĂ©ral pour l'ÉgalitĂ© des Chances (UNIA), Brussels, Belgium
-A representative from the Government of Catalonia
-A representative from the Peace in Our Cities network and +Peace initiative

Workshop
16:00 - 17:30
How to implement an integrated strategy for the local nightlife?

With the participation of:

- Thierry Charlois, Political Programme Manager for Nightlife, City of Paris
- Vanina Hallab, Programme Manager for Crime Prevention – Coordinator of the ‘Bordeaux At Night’ Project, City of Bordeaux
- Denis Tallédec, Director of the Culture Barbars Collective and Coordinator of the Nightlife Platform
- Simone D’Antonio, Project representative, ToNite
- RenĂĄta Gallai, Responsible for tourism, culture and nightlife, 7th District, City of Budapest
- Dweimante Rimkute, City Councillor, City of Vilnius

Workshop
16:00 - 17:30
Technologies in Urban Security: Opportunities and challenges of the city of the future

The use of technologies has become increasingly common as a means of addressing security challenges, such as incivilities, crowd management, or terrorist threats. For a long time, the emphasis was put on video surveillance technologies. Today, increased computer performance and advances in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) have brought new technologies to the fore and improved the capacities of existing ones. In addition to surveillance technologies, a whole range of civic technologies have emerged that facilitate the involvement of citizens in various governance tasks to improve the quality of public services, including public safety.
How can local stakeholders make an appropriate selection of technologies that respond to their safety needs, and how do these technologies facilitate good governance of urban safety policies? What functionalities of the smart city can be relevant to security and crime prevention? What are the main risks associated with technologies? Can the right to experimentation help cities assess the impact of new technologies on urban security?

With the participation of:

- Paul Ekblom, Visiting Professor, Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London
- Anniina Autero, Senior Project Manager, City of Tampere (Finland)
- Alexander Gluba, Research Fellow, Lower Saxony State Office of Criminal Investigation (TBC)
- Robin Caroff, Technical Lead, Resonantes

Delinquency Prevention Prize awards ceremony
16:00 - 17:30
French Forum for Urban Security

The prize is awarded each year by the French Forum for Urban Security to local actors who implemented inspiring prevention practicies at the local level. This year's topic was "security and mobility".

With the participation of Christian Gravel, Secretary General of the French Inter-ministerial Committee for the Prevention of Delinquency and Radicalisation

In French, no translation.

Cocktail welcome reception provided by the City of Nice
18:30 - 20:00

Thursday 21 October
Thursday 21 October
Arrival of participants
08:30 - 09:00

Plenary Session
09:00 - 09:30

Democracy in danger: local and regional authorities, cornerstone of the protection of the Rule of Law

Field Visits

The field visits will take place throughout the day, starting at 09:30 and finishing at 18:00. Registration will be recquired, group departures from the Acropolis.

Workshop
09:30 - 11:00
Know your problem to solve your problem: innovating tools and methods to address urban security challenges

Local and regional authorities are faced with constantly-evolving security challenges. They have to deal with shifts in governance structures and limited financial resources. Another important factor is high-tech development, which changes the way we tackle problems. This means public policy makers have to continually adapt their services to new challenges in the field. Such adaptability is only possible if they have the right tools to properly understand these challenges. How can cities multiply sources of information and foster an environment in which every population group’s realities and perceptions of urban security are taken into account? How to include a diverse and representative range of stakeholders? How to decide what information is relevant and how to weigh perceptions of insecurity?

With the participation of:

- Barbara Holtmann, Director, Fixed Africa
- Caroline Davey, Director, Design against Crime Solution Center, University of Manchester
- Angelos Mimis, Associate Professor, University of Panteion

Workshop
09:30 - 11:00
Tackling polarisation in our cities: tools and practices to foster inclusive and cohesive societies

As it fuels conflict and forecloses opportunities for dialogue and mutual understanding, polarisation threatens social cohesion and urban security. It can be understood as a process of sharpening differences between groups in society that can result in increased tensions; as rampant ‘us-and-them thinking’, social division and hostility that gain ground in our communities and as a driving factor of radicalisation that may lead to extremist violence. Polarisation and escalating tensions have increased during the Covid-19 pandemic in cities and regions throughout Europe, and created a breeding ground for violent extremism. Addressing polarisation is thus an integral part of comprehensive strategies to prevent urban violence and foster social cohesion.
How can local and regional authorities prevent and mitigate polarisation in times of crisis?
How can we foster and facilitate dialogue between different groups of society?
Which tools and practices have been tested to mitigate polarisation and foster inclusiveness and participation in our cities?
Which stakeholders need to be involved?

Workshop
09:30 - 11:00
The involvement and role of citizens in crisis management

The Covid pandemic, floods in Alemannic Europe, fires in the Mediterranean: the events of the past few months have once again shed light on the central role that local authorities play in disaster response. Whatever the severity or nature of these major crises (health, climate, but also terrorism, chemical accidents, etc.), local authorities must plan their prevention and respond to them by employing locally-available resources. To guarantee the ultimate efficiency of such measures, it is essential that citizens are included in emergency planning and crisis management.
> Why is it essential to improve coordination between citizens and civil protection stakeholders?
> How can authorities / public services ensure the legitimacy, creation, and recognition of citizen-led initiatives or actions?
> How can we restructure / fluidify collaborations between stakeholders in order to improve different forms of crisis management and thus service to citizens?

With the participation of:
- Yves van de Vloet, Associated Expert, Efus (TBC)
- Hans Das, Director of the Emergency Management and rescEU service, DG ECHO (TBC)
- Gil Marsalla, General Director, Directo Productions (TBC)
- Florian Neisser, Senior Researcher, Fraunhofer INT (TBC)

Parallel Session
09:30 - 11:00
Design thinking methodology - IcARUS

This methodology, developped in the framework of the IcARUS (Innovative AppRoaches to Urban Security) project, will be presented during the workshop.

In English, no translation.

Coffee Break / Focus sessions
11:00 - 11:30

Networking

Workshop
11:30 - 13:00
Local roots and impacts of organised crime

Organised crime is embedded in local economic and social structures and operates both internationally and locally. It is a threat to many development objectives, such as the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) nÂș16 – “peace, justice and strong institutions” –, and it is an obstacle to peaceful and inclusive societies, and to accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. This is why local authorities should be encouraged to combine social, economic and repressive measures to prevent and fight it. The Covid-19 pandemic has fuelled some types of crime, in particular in the cyber space, while organised crime has adapted by shifting some of its operations.
> What lessons can be learnt from this situation in order to achieve long-term sustainable results in the fight against organised crime?
> What practices have local and regional authorities implemented to foster a culture of legality, to prevent the infiltration of organised crime, and to fight against trafficking?

With the participation of

- Alessandro Bondi, Professor, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Member of the Scientific Committee of the Rimini’s Observatory on Organised Crime
- Floriana Sipala, Head of Unit, Organised Crime, Drugs & Corruption, European Commission (TBC)
- A representative from the City of Berlin

Workshop
11:30 - 13:00
Security continuum and the diversification of security stakeholders

Local security and crime prevention policies involve a large number of public and private stakeholders who need to coordinate their interventions within the remit of the respective competencies. Complementing national authorities’ exclusive competencies such as the national police and the justice system, local and regional authorities carry out activities that contribute to public security and peace. The increase in demand for security, which is notably linked to the terrorist attacks of the past decade or so, has been met with an increase in the offer. Besides the public institutions operating in the security field, other stakeholders contribute to security policies, such as the third sector, citizens, the commercial sector and private security companies. All these actors have different professional cultures, modus operandi and purposes, which raises questions about training, and the need to clarify their respective roles and prerogatives, to harmonize legislations, to cooperate, and to take into account actions led by citizens and civil society.
> How to bring about a common ‘security culture’?
> How to clarify the roles and interventions of these different stakeholders in order to increase their efficiency?
> What training should these actors receive?
> How to take into account citizens and civil society?

Workshop
11:30 - 13:00
For a fair and transparent use of AI technologies in urban security

Artificial intelligence (AI)-based technologies offer an array of opportunities in the domain of urban security, such as, to name a few, searching for missing people, tracking criminals, facilitating administrative decision-making, and processing large amounts of data that can guide security authorities in their daily operations. The implementation of such technologies requires to properly understand and weigh their ethical, legal and social implications, such as infringing on the right to privacy, free movement and association, or the risk of bias and discrimination.
> What are the ethical, legal and social risks of employing AI-based technology in the domain of urban security and crime prevention?
> How to reconcile the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms with security imperatives?
> How to preserve anonymity in public spaces?
> How can local authorities build public trust in their use of technology?
> How can risk minimization requirements such as high-quality datasets, traceability and appropriate human oversight be mainstreamed?

With the participation of:

- A representative from to the CAHAI, Council of Europe
- William Eldin, CEO, XXII
- Linda Van de Fliert, Public Tech Project Manager, City of Amsterdam (Netherlands) (TBC)
- Oskar Gstrein, Assistant professor, University of Groningen

Parallel Session
11:30 - 13:00
EU funding opportunities for local and regional authorities

This workshop will be the occasion to explore EU funding opportunities for local and regional authorities. It is organised in the framework of the Partnership on security in public spaces of the Urban agenda for the European Union (Action 2), coordinated by Efus, the Cities of Nice and Madrid.

In English, no translation.

Lunch / Focus sessions
13:00 - 14:30
Networking

Networking

Workshop
14:30 - 16:00
A just city, a mediator city

Local authorities are key actors in preventing conflicts and tensions that arise among the local population from escalating, and when these do nevertheless flare up, they can intervene to de-escalate the situation. They can use a range of innovative tools and methods to rapidly and impartially mediate between opposing groups, such as the concept of “Mediator City” whereby a permanent Peacemaking Committee working closely with the local administration is tasked with prevention and conflict resolution, or the Restorative City, which uses restorative justice methods and tools.
> How can local authorities effectively and impartially mediate conflicts?
> What concrete tools can local authorities mobilise to decrease or de-escalate tensions and conflicts?

With the participation of:

- Tim Chapman, Expert and Chair, European Forum for Restorative Justice
- Ivo Aertsen, Emeritus Professor of Criminology, University of Leuven

Workshop
14:30 - 16:00
How to restore and strengthen trust between citizens and institutions?

The latest Eurostat barometer of EU citizens’ confidence in European institutions shows an overall 10% drop since 2014, albeit with strong disparities between Member States. European citizens tend to trust less European institutions, which they consider distant and disconnected from their daily concerns, than national and local authorities. The handling of the Covid crisis has further damaged trust in some EU countries. Mayors and other local elected officials are on the front line regarding the issues that matter most to citizens, embodying day-to-day politics and the resolution of practical issues. Local authorities have the power to mobilise and organise solidarity and are key intermediaries and facilitators between institutions and citizens. However, this proximity also has a negative side when citizens express their anger or frustration by directly attacking local elected officials. In France, this type of assault has trebled between 2019 and 2020. The gender issue is also at play in the aggressions against female elected officials.
> How to restore relations and trust between citizens and local elected officials?
> What are the benefits of co-producing security with citizens, and how to implement or strengthen such cooperation?
> What new tools can local authorities use to improve citizens’ confidence in public institutions?

With the participation of:
- Sándor RÓNAI, Member of the European Parliament (TBC)
- A representative from the Association des maires de France et des présidents d'intercommunalité (AMF)
- A representative from the Observatoire international des maires sur le Vivre ensemble

Workshop
14:30 - 16:00
Climate change and urban security - How to foster urban resilience?

As urban settings are particularly exposed to the impacts of climate change, cities are compelled to undergo transformations in almost every sector and area of urban life. As we collectively reflect on the impact of climate change on urban security and explore the role of urban security actors in the development of resilience strategies, three aspects must be explored:
1) How does climate change, notably extreme weather events, impact urban security, and what indirect effects should be taken into account, e.g increasing socioeconomic inequalities, changing use patterns of public urban spaces?
2) The recent floods and wildfires in Europe led to the loss of lives and livelihoods and crimes occurring in the aftermath exacerbated the tense situation in the affected areas. How can crime prevention be included into comprehensive crisis management and disaster relief plans?
3) As many cities are ready to develop resilience strategies, how can we include urban security aspects? How can the cooperation with relevant services (eg. urban planning, environmental departments) be facilitated?

With the participation of:

- Carlos Alberto Mendonça Rabaçal, City Councilman, SetĂșbal (Portugal)
- Felix Munger, Consultant & Coordinator, Municipal Network on Crime Prevention, Canada
- Anna Rau, Coordinator, German Forum for Urban Security (DEFUS)

Parallel Session
14:30 - 16:00

More information to come soon

Coffee Break / Focus sessions
16:00 - 16:30

Networking

Workshop
16:30 - 18:00
How cities can design and manage safer, more inclusive public spaces

The Covid pandemic, floods in Alemannic Europe, fires in the Mediterranean: the events of the past few months have once again shed light on the central role that local authorities play in disaster response. Whatever the severity or nature of these major crises (health, climate, but also terrorism, chemical accidents, etc.), local authorities must plan their prevention and respond to them by employing locally-available resources. To guarantee the ultimate efficiency of such measures, it is essential that citizens are included in emergency planning and crisis management.
> Why is it essential to improve coordination between citizens and civil protection stakeholders?
> How can authorities / public services ensure the legitimacy, creation, and recognition of citizen-led initiatives or actions?
> How can we restructure / fluidify collaborations between stakeholders in order to improve different forms of crisis management and thus service to citizens?

With the participation of:

- Paul Van Sommeren, Founder, DSP-Groep, Chair, Working Group on crime prevention and cooperation between stakeholders, European Committee of standardisation (CEN)
- Laetitia Wolff, Design impact consultant and instructor, Sustainable Design School of Nice
- Umberto Nicolini, Director, Laboratorio QualitĂ  Urbana E Sicurezza (LabQUS), Chair, EU Cost Action TU1203
- Ana VerĂłnica Neves, Sociologist & Crime Prevention Expert, Lisbon Municipal Police

Workshop
16:30 - 18:00
Drugs and risk reduction: building a global policy

As new types of illicit substances become available and new modes of consumption create new risks, local authorities see new drug markets taking shape and face new challenges in preventing such traffics and reducing risks.
The current legislative framework cannot be used to reduce consumption and safeguard public spaces, which is where most of the consumption and trafficking take place. The existence of a drug market and the fact that it is sometimes openly visible to citizens have serious health consequences (addiction, transmission of diseases, cleanliness of public spaces) as well as a significant impact on security (public and mixed spaces being ‘occupied’, social control, trafficking, score settling between rival gangs
) and on the culture of legality (feeling of lawlessness and of the impotence of local and national public institutions as being impotent).
> To what extent can local authorities intervene against drugs, which is a political issue controlled by national governments?
> Local authorities have developed a whole array of risk reduction measures. How to promote these measures and to develop new ones, in accordance with the law?
All types of dependency should be considered as well as each individual characteristic in order to bring about universal risk reduction in accordance with the characteristics of each neighbourhood and each community of partners. If the prevention of risks is a key aspect of any local policy on drugs, drug trafficking must also be addressed.
> What opportunities do local authorities have to prevent young people from getting into trafficking?

Workshop
16:30 - 18:00
How can local authorities foster youth participation in urban security policies?

There are about 1.2 billion people aged between 15 and 24 in the world, approximately 15% of the population. These young people are key agents in building democratic cultures and societies and represent a creative force and a dynamic source of innovations. However, the young also face poverty, barriers to education, multiple forms of discrimination and limited employment prospects and opportunities. Efus believes it is necessary to mobilise young citizens to build social cohesion and a more inclusive society. Initiatives aimed at encouraging their participation in urban security policies should be promoted and reinforced by local authorities.
> What measures and tools do local authorities have at their disposal to encourage youth actions and engagement in policy-making?
> Which actors must be mobilised at the local level to obtain meaningful results?
> What are the benefits for local authorities of involving young people in the design and implementation of security policies?
> How can peers be mobilised?

With the participation of:

- Götz Nordbruch, Co-founder and Co-executive director, Ufuq.de
- A representative from the Talented Youth Network (TYN)

Parallel Session
16:30 - 18:00

More information to come soon

Dinner

Friday 22 October
Friday 22 October
Arrival of participants
08:30 - 09:00

Workshop
09:00 - 10:30
Tourism & Security

Workshop
09:00 - 10:30
Foresight strategies to better protect public spaces and promote urban resilience

Complex emergencies, crisis situations and terrorist threats against vulnerable public spaces considered as soft targets call upon local authorities, responsible for the safety and security of citizens, to step up their efforts and devise strategies that better equip them to respond to such threats and risks. This requires keeping abreast of the evolving threats and risks that can affect urban public spaces. It also means that local security practitioners must adopt better protection practices.

With the participation of:

- Peter Van de Crommert, Coordinator EU Projects, Dutch Institute for Technology, Safety & Security (DITSS)
- Marc Leoutre, Policy Officer, Counter-Terrorism Unit, DG HOME
- Miila Lukkarinen, Specialist, Safety and Preparedness Unit, City Executive Office, Helsinki (Finland) (TBC)
- Adam Crawford, Director, Social Sciences Institute, University of Leeds

Workshop
09:00 - 10:30
Tackling polarisation in our cities: Tools and practices to foster inclusive and cohesive societies

With the participation of:

- HĂ©lĂšne Geoffroy, Mayor, City of Vaulx-en-Velin (France)
- Van Herle Werner, Head of the Department Security and Prevention, City of Mechelen (Belgium)
- Markus Pausch, Professor FH, Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department for Social Work and Innovation

Panel of mayors
09:00 - 10:30
French Forum for Urban Security (FFSU)

With the participation of :

- Roger Vicot, Mayor of Lomme (France), Vice-President of the European Metropolis of Lille, Departmental Councillor for the Nord, President of the French Forum for Urban Security (FFSU)
- Pierre Hurmic, Mayor of Bordeaux (France)

In French, no translation.

Coffee Break / Focus sessions
10:30 - 11:00

Networking

Panel of Mayors
11:00 - 12:30
Cities of innovation and solidarity

With the participation of:

- Matteo Biffoni, Mayor of Prato (Italy), President of the Italian Forum for Urban Security (FISU)
- Aleksandra Dulkiewicz, Mayor of Gdansk (Poland)
- LuĂ­sa Maria Neves Salgueiro, Mayor of Matosinhos (Portugal)

Lunch / Focus sessions
12:30 - 14:00
Networking

Networking

Closing session
14:00 - 15:30

With the participation of:

- Willy Demeyer, Mayor of LiĂšge (Belgium), President of Efus
- Christian Estrosi, Mayor of Nice (France), Vice-President of Efus

Thursday 21 October

Conference dinner

The optional conference dinner on Thursday 21 October must be reserved at the time of registration.

Coffee breaks and lunches are included in the conference registration fees and do not require additional payment on the participant’s side.

Side events